Name change signals expanded ability for patent owners to leverage their IP


A name’s an important clue to how a company represents itself to the world.

So, the change to IP Nexus from IP Exchange represents a business and philosophical change for the Hong Kong based but globally oriented company.

Its founder and CEO Hidero (Hidi) Niioka got hold of sticK to remind New Zealand SME owners of the marketplace which aims to connect patent owners with others looking for the solutions the patents’ offer.

The Nexus (rather than Exchange) term seems appropriate for an organisations that’s grown considerably since first mentioned in stick in June 2012. (One definition of nexus is a connection or series of connections linking two or more things).

For startups, inventors, universities, SMEs and other entrepreneurs looking to use their IP beyond New Zealand’s shores, the continuing development of IP Nexus offers considerable advantages says Hidi.

Part of this built on three (new) pillars, compared to IP Exchange.

  • Ask an expert – post questions and get expert answers for free

  • Services marketplace – post jobs nad gets experts’ bids

  • Directory – search for specific technical or regional expertise worldwide

Hidi points out that while the NZ government (and many others around the world) promotes innovation, accelerator platforms and the like, there is a need to make related advice and services more accessible for those launching new ventures, especially those who are looking outside their home markets.

The goal of our new services is to make it easier for inventors, startups and other small businesses to develop their ventures and protect and monetise their IP,” says Hidi.

Signing up is free, so if you are just looking for basis advice, it won’t cost you anything. On the other hand, if you need specialised technical or cross-border expertise, you connect easily to the relevant professionals through a simple search.”

IP Nexus’ experts are able to answer some questions for free, and prices for services are negotiable beyond that. It has over 200 IP experts onboard representing a broad base of global and technical expertise from New Zealand and Australia, to Silicon Valley, Europe, Japan and China. It also has over 61,000 patents and other IP available for search.

Under the company’s model, patent owners can upload as many patents as they want for free for marketing to potential commercialisation agents such as IP brokers, law firms and interested technology companies.

Patent owners only pay a success fee of 4-12% is there successful sale or licence of the patent.

As is often pointed out about NZ patent holders, Kiwi businesses often completely ignore the option of selling or licensing patents overseas.

Given that most NZ inventions will also be applicable in other countries, IP Nexus is an idea worth exploring while protecting the patent. Check it out at ipnexus.com

Advertisements

About sticknz

sticK is by Peter Kerr, a writer for hire. I have a broad science and technology background and interest, with an original degree in agricultural science. My writing speciality is making the complex understandable. I am available for outside consultancy work, and for general discussions of converting a good idea into something positive
This entry was posted in contract writer, Development, Entrepreneur, Innovation, Market validation, Patent, SciBlogs, start-up, technology, university, writer for hire and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Name change signals expanded ability for patent owners to leverage their IP

  1. bdbinc says:

    Do you know how the TPPA will effect current IP (and governing legislation)?
    Have you told small business in NZ what will happen to them if the TPPA is forced through?
    Have you read the TPPA’s chapter on intellectual property ?
    https://notpublicaddress.wordpress.com/2015/02/01/trans-pacific-partnershiptpp-a-non-transparent-us-corporate-trade-agreement-from-hell/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s